MasterCard Poker Deposits Priceless for some, Painful for others

Throughout the years, the available number of options for depositing at an online poker room has gone from abundant to significantly limited. MasterCard poker sites have been plentiful all along, but the ability to use this brand of credit/debit card has diminished tremendously, especially for internet gaming enthusiasts in the United States.

In this article, we’ll take a look at the relative ease of MasterCard poker deposits, as well as the issues many players have encountered in doing so. Finally, we’ll discuss some simple, common remedies for the problem.

MasterCard Poker Deposits

Making a deposit at an online poker room with a MasterCard credit/debit card is as easy as it gets. Once logged in, the player can visit the cashier, choose this payment method and simply enter the required info (name, address, card number, etc.) From there, the player can enter the amount they wish to deposit—most poker sites will invoke a minimum and maximum purchase amount of $10-$10,000—and submit.

The funds should appear in the player’s account instantly. But in many cases, an error message will appear instead…

MasterCard Poker Declinations

MasterCard poker deposits often declined
Due to the prominence of credit card fraud over the internet, some credit/debit card companies and issuing banks have decided not to facilitate monetary transfers meant for online gambling. Because of this, even though a site may claim to accept MasterCard poker deposits, they are often declined during processing.

The fault does not lie with the poker site, nor does it necessarily fall on the shoulders of the MasterCard company. More often than not, it is the bank that issued the MasterCard that chooses not to accept internet gaming related purchases. Bank of America and Wells Fargo, for instance, are notorious for this.

Other possible reasons that a MasterCard poker deposit could be declined are the input of erroneous information on the player’s part. If the name and address entered on the poker site do not exactly match those associated with the card, or if the 3-digit CVV2 security number (found on the back of the card) is incorrect, the payment will be declined. And, of course, if there are insufficient funds/credit limit to cover the purchase, it will be declined as well.

Remedies for Declined MasterCard Poker Deposits

Contrary to popular belief, MasterCard poker deposits don’t have to be made directly in order to succeed. A number of resolutions have been discovered that allow players to use their MasterCard to load funds to another payment method, then transfer those funds to a poker site.

Prepaid Card / Voucher via MasterCard

PrePaid Cards and online vouchers are an excellent option for players who wish to use MasterCard. BetOnline, for example, provides a PrePaid Card payment option direct from the website. Online poker players can log in, use a MasterCard to purchase a virtual PrePaid Card (voucher), then turn right around and use the PrePaid card to fund their poker account. It’s just as secure as a direct MasterCard poker deposit, and all takes place on the website.

Cash Transfer via MasterCard

Many poker sites will accept cash transfers, such as Western Union or Money Gram. Both of these options can be funded via MasterCard, although there will be a fee incurred for using the cash transfer option, depending on the method of choice and size of the deposit.

Online Payment Processor via MasterCard

Another popular alternative is to open an account with an online payment processor, then use MasterCard to fund that account. There are different online payment processors available in different regions of the world.

WSOP.com, available in New Jersey and Nevada, now accepts both Neteller and MasterCard poker deposits, as does BetOnline and some other US-facing poker sites. If a direct MasterCard deposit fails, the player can fund a Neteller account with their credit/debit card, then transfer the funds instantly via the online payment processor. Similarly, 888Poker NJ accepts Skrill (formerly Moneybookers).

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